Crown Corners

The crown corner kacheln are usually the largest pieces in one of our projects. They tend to get made toward the tail end of the production cycle, and because of this there is always a sense of excitement when it’s time to work on them. They are usually the most difficult and time-consuming parts to make. The corners are extremely heavy and unwieldy. Glazing is done by propping them up over a large container and pouring liquid over the piece.

This glaze required three poured coats to achieve the desired effect. This is the application of the final coat.

This glaze yields a beautiful matte black finish with a subtle hint of green.

This is a massive kachelofen. Its overall height is 280cm (9’2″). We are looking forward to seeing it once the bench is built around the base of the unit and the rest of the room is completed!

Final Firing

It always feels great once the last few pieces of a project come out of the kiln. Our natural workflow has been interrupted by the pandemic, and it has often felt like things in the studio are taking longer to get done. Tasiana’s stove is a perfect example of this. Tasiana and Mathew signed off on this design back in September. Under normal circumstances these pieces would have been shipped out in January or February. The extra time involved however, turned into an advantage as we were able to refine the design of two parts of this stove. These refinements will make the installation process smoother!

technical drawing of Tasiana’s stove

The design includes a cat motif as part of a decorative garland around the top of the stove. We are extremely happy with how this section has turned out.

The uppermost ring of the stove

The last pieces out of the kiln were the abdeckplatten. These are the tiles that go on top of the stove.

Tiles for the top of Tasiana’s Stove. The “marquee” kacheln showing the date can also be seen here. There are parts for two other projects as well.

If all goes well we will ship this project out by the end of May!

Looking Back to 2012

One of the most important projects in Jessica’s development as a designer of kachelofen was the “Chesapeake” from 2012. This was her first kachelofen that included a heated bench. It was also her first “multi-use” design. The right hand side of the unit includes a bake oven and a cooking surface:

Cecile Davis, a local filmmaker, made this informative and fun video while Jessica and Mario were doing the installation.

Mario and I installing in Easton, MD, 2012

Now that you have seen how I make Kacheln, here is a little video on what goes into installing this Kachelofen. 2012

Posted by Kachelöfen by Jessica Steinhäuser on Saturday, January 14, 2017

The inner firebrick flue system of the oven is typically built in tandem with the outer decorative bricks. In this case Mario and Jessica had to do as much work as possible on the outside of the oven due to a catastrophic shipping delay! Hurricane Sandy had shut down much of the Eastern Seabord, and delivery schedules were completely thrown out of sync. This meant that the European portion of materials had not yet arrived when work commenced.

In the end they were able to make the most of things by taking a day off in the middle of the build!